nydailynews.com nydailynews.com 31 Dec, 2020 10:30 am

Put port workers toward the front of the vaccine line

Put port workers toward the front of the vaccine line
Who should get priority for the COVID vaccine? Tough question. A multitude of occupations keep life moving along. But consider who’s at the crux of the supply chain: the frontline workers of the shipping industry.

(Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Think of it this way: If longshore workers don’t unload containers of meat and produce from ships arriving at the Port of New York and New Jersey, grocery store shelves soon will be bare.If crews don’t offload fuel from tankers in New York Harbor, heating oil could become scarce; gas stations might run out of gas.It’s safe to say that most of the 28 million customers dependent on the Port of New York and New Jersey don’t realize that their food, clothing, medical supplies, heating oil and so many other indispensable items are delivered via ship and tanker.The Port of New York and New Jersey is the largest port on the East Coast, and second-largest in the country.

“Over the past few months we have seen record-breaking volumes at the Port of New York and New Jersey, and we expect that trend to continue into early 2021,” the Port Authority’s Port Director Sam Ruda said in his final executive broadcast on Dec.In coordination with the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) and the New York Shipping Association, terminal operators tried to reduce in-person transactions and touchpoints throughout the terminals.

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