malaymail.com 02 May, 2021 13:45 am

Police, political interference and how it led to the police force being estranged from society — Karen Cheah Yee Lynn

Police, political interference and how it led to the police force being estranged from society — Karen Cheah Yee Lynn
MAY 2 — Tan Sri Abdul Hamid Bador’s recent call that the Police Force Commission (SPP) should not be chaired by a ‘Minister’ to prevent any political interference is a timely one. It appears from the newspaper article that there may have been interference in the management of the police...

MAY 2 — Tan Sri Abdul Hamid Bador’s recent call that the Police Force Commission (SPP) should not be chaired by a ‘Minister’ to prevent any political interference is a timely one.It appears from the newspaper article that there may have been interference in the management of the police force in the form of appointments of CPOs, Bukit Aman directors and IGP.” What is the consequence of politicians interfering in the management of the police force and will the appointment of key officials within the police force affect the society?Going back to our legal framework, the structure of SPP members is contained in Article 140(3) of the Malaysian Federal Constitution which states that the SPP shall consist of the Minister for the time being charged with responsibility for the police (Home Minister), who shall be the Chairman; the officer of police in general command of the police force; the person performing the duties of the office of Secretary General of the Ministry under the Minister for the time being charged with responsibility for the police; a member of the Public Services Commission appointed by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (YDPA); no less than two or more than six other members appointed by the YDPA.

Decisions on who would be fit and proper to be appointed within the police force must surely be made by the entire SPP board, rather than by the Home Minister alone, and surely it must go through the rigamarole of good screening practices established, solely in the interest of the Malaysian public so that the police force can properly carry out their expected societal duties.The ‘line’ spoken of, is of course ‘political line’, and not the societal lines we expect the police force to provide us with.

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