nydailynews.com nydailynews.com 27 Dec, 2020 11:00 am

No way to pick a leader: New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

No way to pick a leader: New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade
With New York staring into the void of a massive budget hole amid skyrocketing crime and unemployment numbers, a relative handful of Democratic voters are poised in less than six months to effectively decide on the city’s next mayor and our course over the next eight years in what’s looking a lot more like a roll of the dice than a measure of the will of the people.

With New York staring into the void of a massive budget hole amid skyrocketing crime and unemployment numbers, a relative handful of Democratic voters are poised in less than six months to effectively decide on the city’s next mayor and our course over the next eight years in what’s looking a lot more like a roll of the dice than a measure of the will of the people.That was a rare win for the WFP’s own candidate (albeit one who later left the party on her way to being elected state attorney general as a Democrat), given that the third party is built on pulling Democrats to the left by leveraging New York State’s “fusion” system that allows candidates to run on multiple ballot lines.Albany’s new wave of Democratic reformers talked a lot about making small-D democracy great again in New York, and they’re off to an excellent start.New Yorkers are barely starting to pay attention to a race, only open to registered Democrats, that’s remained ill-defined despite the sky-high stakes as top candidates have largely avoided direct confrontations because the primary field is so crowded that none of them see much upside to launching attacks or standing out too much in a contest where voters’ second and third choices are expected to matter this time with ranked-choice voting.

Fusion — which until this year also supported the scammy Independence Party whose line Bloomberg rented and that’s made up mostly of people who accidentally joined thinking they were declaring their small-I independence — is the main reason why the city’s new ranked-choice voting system, assuming it survives a dubious legal challenge from allies of mayor candidate Eric Adams, only applies in primaries and special elections, not general elections: because a system that lets you list several candidates in order of preference doesn’t play well with one where the same candidate appears on multiple ballot lines.Bloomberg sort of tried, with his first-term push for non-partisan primaries in which the top two candidates would then face off in general elections.

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