The Guardian Nigeria News - Nigeria and World News guardian.ng 21 Sep, 2020 04:30 am

Nigerians push food as human right in constitutionFeatures

Nigerians push food as human right in constitutionFeatures
As prices of food items skyrocket due to production, storage, processing, and marketing challenges, lawmakers and policymakers have been called upon

Related As operators count losses, experts optimistic of boom in Nigeria’s serviced apartments UAE may reverse visa restriction on Nigerians today amid airline’s ban Group tasks Buhari on electoral reforms, moves for South-East president in 2023 • Advocates say, ‘No food security without constitutional backing’ As prices of food items skyrocket due to production, storage, processing, and marketing challenges, lawmakers and policymakers have been called upon to make the right to food a human right in the constitution, without which there can be no food security and agribusiness development in Nigeria.By moving the food security provision from chapter two to chapter four, citizens can better engage the government over failure to make food available and affordable by not providing requisites such as irrigation facilities, rural road networks, market, and other rural infrastructure, thereby influencing policy authorities to create an enabling environment and the productivity and security of the farm population (crop and livestock farmers alike); these being the responsibility of the government and connected to food production and availability in all parts of the country.They propose that Mr President be mandated to produce and review on yearly basis an implementation strategy as a schedule to the bill, and to deliver an annual Food Situation Address to the National Assembly in accountability for the huge resources appropriated for the purpose, and in recognition of food security as the bedrock of national security.The bill, it is argued, is geared towards the improvement of the policy environment for food security and agribusiness in terms of policy responsibility, accountability, transparency, and due process on the part of the government.

” It is also argued that the bill would give a voice and a vote for the people in food security governance of the country, thereby ensuring their full participation in the policy process beyond their present token involvement.” Giving an insight into the genesis of the move, the Farm & Infrastructure Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation for promoting policy best practices in agriculture and rural development, with a particular focus on food security and agribusiness, said the purpose of the memorandum “is to register our humble appeal for the favourable consideration of the Right to Food Bill currently before the Ad hoc Committee on the Review of the 1999 Constitution; which Bill was passed on to the Committee for further deliberation following its successful First and Second Readings earlier in this year.

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