Stars and Stripes stripes.com 13 Jan, 2021 03:15 am

Family of still-missing WWII Medal of Honor recipient asks DOD to stop using his name

Family of still-missing WWII Medal of Honor recipient asks DOD to stop using his name
Frustrated by what they call a decades-long “bureaucratic logjam” in bringing his remains home from the Philippines, the family of First Lt. Alexander “Sandy” Nininger is requesting the federal government remove the soldier’s name from all public buildings and installations.

Family of still-missing WWII Medal of Honor recipient asks DOD to stop using his name First Lt.JOHN PATTERSON The descendants of World War II’s first Medal of Honor recipient are requesting the federal government remove the soldier’s name from all public buildings and installations, a move coming after what they call a decades-long “bureaucratic logjam” in bringing his remains home from the Philippines.He was given a hasty burial and subsequently became the war’s first service member to receive the Medal of Honor in the early days of the conflict when Imperial Japan invaded and occupied a huge swath of Asia.” Nininger’s Medal of Honor citation describes the young officer moving single-handedly against the invaders.

In 2017, Patterson was one of seven plaintiffs who filed a lawsuit in federal court seeking to force the federal government — including the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the entity primarily tasked with identifying remains — to conduct DNA tests on sets of remains buried as “unknowns” in the Philippines.Alexander "Sandy" Nininger, serving with the 57th Infantry Regiment, Philippine Scouts, died in battle on Jan.

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