Newsweek newsweek.com 22 Sep, 2020 04:45 am

Fall Equinox Comes As Gas Giants Jupiter, Saturn Pair up in the Sky Before Harvest Moon

Fall Equinox Comes As Gas Giants Jupiter, Saturn Pair up in the Sky Before Harvest Moon
In the Northern Hemisphere, the September equinox marks the beginning of what's set to be quite an eventful astronomical fall.

Today marks the fall equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and the spring equinox in the Southern Hemisphere—an astronomical event that, this year, coincides with gas giants Jupiter and Saturn pairing up in the night sky.When the North Pole is tilted away from the sun, the Northern Hemisphere enters winter—in astronomical terms—while summer in the Southern Hemisphere begins.When the North Pole is tilted toward our star, the opposite is true: the Northern Hemisphere enters summer and winter begins in the Southern Hemisphere.Newsweek subscription offers > In the Northern Hemisphere, the September equinox marks the beginning of fall in astronomical terms, while in the Southern Hemisphere, it heralds the start of spring.

The fall equinox also comes just over a week before a full moon graces the skies on October 1, according to The Old Farmer's Almanac.In North America, the full moon that occurs closest to the fall equinox is usually named "the Harvest Moon"—a moniker that originated with Native American tribes.

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