World Socialist Web Site wsws.org 29 Mar, 2021 00:00 am

Dr. Seuss publishers unleash controversy over legacy of famed children’s author

Dr. Seuss publishers unleash controversy over legacy of famed children’s author
Neither side in this dispute within the political establishment cares a stitch about the education or development of children.

” The six titles that have been removed span four decades: And to Think that I Saw It on Mulberry Street (1937), McElligot’s Pool (1941, finished 1947), If I Ran the Zoo (1950), Scrambled Eggs Super!The reason cited has been cartoon images, drawn by Geisel himself, that are considered derogatory or insensitive, as in the case of a sketch of a Chinese man included towards the end of Mulberry Street, the first of his successful series of children’s books.That Seuss found his métier in 1937 was recognised by noted British children’s author Beatrix Potter ( The Tale of Peter Rabbit and many others) when she received a copy of And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.The theme across Mulberry Street —he has to pare it back again for his dad at the end of the story—it’s a great example of what writers do.

In the early 1940s, after years of working in advertising and having already published And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street and Horton Hatches the Egg (1940), Geisel (born in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1904) began working as a political cartoonist for PM, the liberal daily newspaper.More than 29 years after his death, children’s author Dr.

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