scoop.co.nz 11 Mar, 2021 05:00 am

Doses Hoarded By US, UK, And EU Could Vaccinate Adults In 20 Countries Facing Worst Humanitarian Crises

Doses Hoarded By US, UK, And EU Could Vaccinate Adults In 20 Countries Facing Worst Humanitarian Crises
by Jessica Corbett, staff writer On the eve of the world marking one year since the coronavirus outbreak was officially declared a pandemic, humanitarians and global justice campaigners are calling out rich countries for hoarding vaccines—including ...

by Jessica Corbett, staff writer On the eve of the world marking one year since the coronavirus outbreak was officially declared a pandemic, humanitarians and global justice campaigners are calling out rich countries for hoarding vaccines—including with a new analysis revealing that excess doses secured by the United States, United Kingdom, and European Union could inoculate all adults in 20 nations facing the worst humanitarian crises.Unlike the other two vaccines authorized for use in the United States, that one only requires a single shot.Although the president has been praised for not only ramping up inoculation efforts across the United States but also recommitting to WHO and joining COVAX, activists and experts argue that, as Peter Maybarduk of Public Citizen put it, "Biden should use his power under existing law to accelerate global vaccine manufacturing—including by sharing the vaccine recipe with qualified manufacturers around the world.), who tweeted Wednesday that he was "proud to join the global call for a People's Vaccine" and that "the United States must play a leading role in making sure a coronavirus vaccine is available to all people around the world.

" The latest annual Emergency Watchlist, released in December, identified 20 humanitarian crises around the world that IRC expected to deteriorate the most in the next year."As the pandemic continues to claim lives and destroy livelihoods worldwide, with variants now arising in several countries, the wealthiest countries have continued purchasing enough doses to cover their entire populations several times over—highlighting and exacerbating the extreme inequality faced by people living in conflict and crisis," declared IRC president and CEO David Miliband.

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