theregister.com 11 Jun, 2021 13:30 am

Deluges and deceit at the dawn of hydroelectric power • The Register

Deluges and deceit at the dawn of hydroelectric power • The Register

The commemorative monument at the start of the footpath listing the dead of the 1925 disaster (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor Aluminium, mountains, and water The story of Dolgarrog is intimately connected to the development of the aluminium industry.The pipeline carrying water from Cowlyd and Coedty to the Dolgarrog power station today (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor The glacial lakes that dot the Carneddau, that large mountain mass to the west of the Conwy Valley made up of mountains with names like Carnedd Dafydd, Carnedd Llewelyn, Foel-Fras and Pen Llithrig y Wrach and which form a rough triangle between the towns of Conwy, Betws-y-Coed and Bangor, had been viewed as a suitable source for the commercial supply of both water and hydroelectric power since the late 19th century.Many, like this one are still in use today (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor Lakes like Llyn (Welsh for lake) Dylun below the mountain of Foel Frach, Llyn Eigiau, Ffynnon Llugwy below Carnedd Dafydd, Llyn Cowlyd and Llyn Crafnant shared common features of being near to significant inclines and geographically close to the fast-growing holiday resorts on the North Wales coast like Llandudno and Colwyn Bay and the industrial areas around Crewe and Wrexham.This wooden gutter carries water from a mountain stream over one on the leats (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor The first hydroelectric power station in the area was established at Cwm Dyli on the southern flank of Snowdon and was powered by water flowing from Llyn Llydaw.

The entire section in this image collapsed on the night of the disaster (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor Cwm Dyli also generated the electricity used to power Britain's first longwave wireless telegraph transmitting station built by Marconi in 1912 at Cefn Du near Waunfawr.The floodwater carved a channel into the valley floor before joining the Afon Porth-Llwyd in the foreground (click to enlarge) Pic: Alun Taylor In 1907, with aluminium selling for a heady £120 per ton, a new company called the Aluminium Corporation Limited (ACL) decided that the ideal place for a processing plant was in the Conwy Valley in the small village of Dolgarrog.

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