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Conservation news mongabay.com 24 Nov, 2021 13:00 am

Chile’s burrowing parrot marks 35 years of a slow but successful recovery

Chile’s burrowing parrot marks 35 years of a slow but successful recovery
Environmental science and conservation news

Down in the Cachapoal River Basin, he dedicated days to counting burrowing parrots (Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami), which were louder and easier to find than guanacos.Burrowing parrots got their name because they form colonies and dig their nests in ravines or hillsides along river basins and water bodies.They also includes plants whose seeds the burrowing parrots feed on: French broom (Genista monspessulana), boldo (Peumus boldus) and litre (Lithraea caustica).In 2017, there were 3,500 parrots; today, according to the most recent CONAF census, there are 4,478 burrowing parrots.

Burrowing parrots are dynamic, according to Pávez.The curriculum features guanacos, burrowing parrots, pumas, high-altitude steppes, glaciers, and the trees that surround them.

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