TRT World trtworld.com 08 Apr, 2021 03:45 am

Bulgarian cave remains reveal surprises about first Homo sapiens in Europe

Bulgarian cave remains reveal surprises about first Homo sapiens in Europe
Researchers detect a genetic contribution from East Asia rather than Europe as they discover 3 to 3.8 percent Neanderthal DNA from the remains of three people, who lived roughly 45,000 years ago.

DNA extracted from remains found in a Bulgarian cave of three people who lived roughly 45,000 years ago has been revealing surprises about some of the first Homo sapiens populations to venture into Europe, including extensive interbreeding with Neanderthals and genetic links to present-day East Asians.The three Bacho Kiro cave males represent the oldest securely dated Homo sapiens individuals from Europe.READ MORE:  Scientists set eyes on Neanderthal 'brain' Interbreeding, known as admixture, between Homo sapiens and Neanderthals before the extinction of Neanderthals sometime after 40,000 years ago has been previously shown, with present-day human populations outside Africa bearing a small percentage of Neanderthal DNA.The prevalence of this interbreeding and the relationship and power dynamics between Homo sapiens and Neanderthals has been harder to understand – including any role our species played in the demise of the Neanderthals.

The new study suggests interbreeding was more common than previously known for the first Homo sapiens in Europe.'Dark skin and dark eyes' Another study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution shed more light on Europe's early Homo sapiens populations.

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